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The following announcement was written by Ancestry.com:

Week of Free Access Enables Families to Discover Stories of Ancestors’ International Travels and Passage

PROVO, UTAH – (August 29, 2011) – Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced an entire week of free access to its popular U.S. and International Immigration and Naturalization records. The free access week begins August 29th and runs through the Labor Day holiday ending September 5th. During this time, all visitors to Ancestry.com will be able to search for free the indices and images of new and updated U.S. immigration records as well as selected international immigration records from the United Kingdom, Ireland, Italy, Australia, Canada, Germany, Sweden and Mexico. Millions of Americans can trace their family history to other countries, and these collections provide valuable information about the travels and journeys that brought them to America or other countries around the world.

Ancestry.com’s extensive collection of immigration, naturalization and travel records offer an important resource for discovering and celebrating family history. As part of this promotion, the company is adding to its collection of U.S. and international records for tracing relatives from their homeland to other countries around the world. These records include ships passenger and crew lists, declarations of intent, petitions for naturalization, witness affidavits, border crossings, certificates and other records generated by the naturalization process, which is the act and procedure of becoming a new citizen of a country. Because the process has changed significantly over time and varies from country to country, different records are available from a wide variety of state, federal and international sources.

Newly added U.S. collections include Florida Petitions for Naturalization, 1913-1991; Delaware Naturalization Records, 1796-1959 and Utah Naturalization and Citizenship Records, 1850-1960. Noteworthy updated U.S. and international collections include U.S. Naturalization and Passport applications, 1795-1972; UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960; Border Crossings: From Canada to U.S., 1895-1956; New South Wales, Australia, Unassisted Immigrant Passenger Lists, 1826-1922; Border Crossings: From Mexico to U.S., 1895-1957; New York State, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1917-1973; Atlantic Ports Passenger Lists, 1820-1873 and 1893-1959.

“One of the most common elements of the American experience is our respect and interest in our native heritage. Almost all Americans have international roots, and many take great pride and even feel patriotic toward the countries from which their ancestors originated,” said Josh Hanna, Ancestry.com Executive Vice President. “That’s why we continue to build and enrich our collection of immigration and naturalization records and why we are providing free access to anyone who wants to search these records to discover their family’s international history.”

Many families have already made important discoveries in Ancestry.com’s immigration and naturalization collection. Each of the following stories offers an example of the exciting and often emotional discoveries made by some Ancestry.com users.

  • David A. Bader – Atlanta, GA: Bader traced his mother’s immigration from birth in Vienna, Austria, in 1934, during the Holocaust, through a KinderTransport to England (1939-1941), and eventually her immigration into the U.S. He’s also traced her parents’ journeys through concentration camps and other paths that lead to the United States, where the family came back together after their separate journeys of luck and fate.
  • Kristine Plotinski – Romeo, MI: Plotinski recently found the ship manifest of when her grandparents and three aunts immigrated to the United States from Iraq in 1947. She shared this document with her aunts and they were deeply touched when they saw their names on the manifest. One of her aunts remarked that she had been unable to find her immigration records on a visit to Ellis Island and recounted that seeing the document from Ancestry.com brought back many memories. Her aunt very clearly remembers the day in 1947 when her ship arrived in New York. She was awed by the lights of New York and the snow and wore a pink coat made with rabbit fur, which her grandmother had made for each of Kristine’s aunts.
  • Jackie Wells – Annapolis, MD: Although her father died of cancer, Wells was fortunate to spend considerable time with him before he passed. Many of their talks focused on his family history. He did not know much about his mother, who died from a fire when he was three, or about her background. His father remarried and supported a blended family, but did not talk about his background. Since those discussions, Wells has traced her father’s side back to the original immigrants, finding early colonial settlers of New England, a sea captain defending New York’s harbor under George Washington in 1776, early residents of the new capital Washington, hard-working mid-1800’s immigrants, Civil War soldiers, sports legends and many poignant personal stories. So far, for two of the immigrants Wells located, she has traveled to and photographed their birth villages, in Italy and in Germany. Wells’ family history research has helped her find and be welcomed by hundreds of newfound relatives who have provided many memories and a much deeper understanding her father’s family history.

To start researching the immigration and naturalization records for free, please visit www.ancestry.com/immigration.

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http://wp.me/Ph5jD-34

I just added a new sub-page to the Public Downloads Page.  This is a transcript of a 26 page booklet published in 1888 for the 10th-year anniversary of the first American Protestant Mission to Paris in January 1878, opened by my great-grandparents, Professor Jules de Launay, D.D., and his wife Anna Augusta (born Ollerrenshaw) de Launay. Jules was the second cousin of Martial Caillebotte (the elder).

Jules emigrated to the U.S. in 1841, and then returned to Paris with Annie as American missionaries in December 1877.  Their sons, Paul and Gaston were both born in Paris, as dual citizens.  Paul de Launay would later be awarded France’s two highest awards:  the National Order of the Legion of Honour (Ordre national de la Légion d’honneur) in 1950, and the medal of Officier d’Académie de France in 1936.  Additionally, in 1926, Paul de Launay was made a member of Société Académique d’histoire Internationale.

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en français:

http://wp.me/Ph5jD-34

Je viens d’ajouter un nouveau sous-page à la page Téléchargements publics. Ceci est une transcription d’un livret de 26 pages publié en 1888 pour le 10e anniversaire l’année de la première mission protestante américaine à Paris en Janvier 1878, ouvert par mes grands-parents, le professeur Jules de Launay, DD, et son épouse Anna Augusta (né Ollerrenshaw) de Launay. Jules était le cousin au second degré de Martial Caillebotte (l’aîné).

Jules a émigré aux Etats-Unis en 1841, puis revint à Paris avec Annie comme missionnaires américains en Décembre 1877. Leur fils, Paul et Gaston sont tous deux nés à Paris, que la double citoyenneté. Paul de Launay sera plus tard attribué France les deux plus hautes distinctions: l’Ordre national de la Légion d’Honneur en 1950, et la médaille d’Officier d’Académie de France en 1936. En outre, en 1926, Paul de Launay a été fait membre de la Société Académique d’histoire internationale.

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This morning my mother and I were cataloging old family photos from the 1800’s and early 1900’s when we finally found the photo of President & Mrs. James A. Garfield we thought was lost.  The photo was given to my great-grandmother, Annie (Ollerenshaw) de Launay in the 1880’s by Mrs. Garfield.  We have a letter dated 20 November 1883, and publish in “The Christian” on 29 December 1883 on page 486 (Microfilm reel 18, Volume 18), that one photo was given to her, along with a photo (on porcelain) of the Late President, during her personal visit to the former First Lady in Ohio in 1883.  The back of this photo, however, seems to show either 1884 or 1887.  The last digit is difficult to read, but appears to be in the First Lady’s handwriting.  The bottom of the backside has other writing that appears to have either worn off, or been scratched off for whatever reason, but is in different handwriting.

The President and Former First Lady gave financial support to my great-grandfather’s Protestant mission to Paris, which began in January 1878.  The “Christian Standard” (a weekly) was first published in Cleveland, Ohio.  James A. Garfield, the future President of the United States, headed the board of Editors of the “Christian Publishing Association”, founded in 1866.

 

En français:

Ce matin, ma mère et moi étions catalogage vieilles photos de famille des années 1800 et début des années 1900 lorsque nous avons finalement trouvé la photo du président et Mme James Garfield A. l’on croyait perdu. La photo a été donné à mon arrière grand-mère, Annie (Ollerenshaw) de Launay dans les années 1880 par Mme Garfield. Nous avons une lettre datée du 20 Novembre 1883, et publie dans “Le chrétien”, le 29 Décembre 1883 sur la page 486 (Bobine de microfilm 18, tome 18), que d’une photo lui a été donné, avec une photo (sur porcelaine) de la Feu le Président, lors de sa visite personnelle de l’ex-Première Dame dans l’Ohio en 1883. Le dos de cette photo, toutefois, semble montrer, soit 1884 ou 1887. Le dernier chiffre est difficile à lire, mais semble être de la main de la Première Dame. Le fond de l’arrière a écrit d’autres qui semble avoir soit disparu, soit été gratté pour une raison quelconque, mais est en écriture différente.

Le président et ex-First Lady a apporté son soutien financier à la mission protestante de mon grand-père à Paris, qui a débuté en Janvier 1878. Le “Christian Standard” (une semaine) a été publiée à Cleveland, Ohio. James A. Garfield, le futur président des États-Unis, a dirigé le comité de rédaction de l ‘«Association chrétienne de publication”, fondée en 1866.

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