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Posts Tagged ‘Ollerenshaw’


I can’t find it published online anywhere yet, but I’m told privately that the “Caillebotte Brothers Private World” exhibition is coming to Canada.  I hope I’m not spilling the beans.  I saw it at the Musee Jacquemart Andre in Paris back in March when it had just opened.  To a cousin of Gustave and Martial, I was more really interested in the family photos, which I had not yet seen.

I’m planning to attend the opening of the Montreal exhibition.  I’m hoping some of the de Launay descendants can make the trip to see not just the exhibition, but our Caillebotte descendant cousins, whom our families had lost touch with after the death of my great-grandmother, Annie de Launay in 1919.  My grandfather was just 15 years old, when Gustave died in 1894, but was already a painter and pianist himself by the age of 9, most likely following in his older cousins’ (Martial the pianist, and Gustave the painter) footsteps.

It’s getting close, so the dates should be announced soon.  I’ll repeat the official dates and location here on this blog when they are released, but I think it will open sometime in early October.

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From page 1, Vol. 1 of “Jules & Paul de Launay” (publish 1983) by Jules Richard de Launay.  The photos which I have added are from my mother, Rosemarie’s collection.

Mes excuses. Je vais imprimer les Français de cet article bientôt.

“On the ninth of December 1813 in Paris, at the church of St. Denis du St. Denis du St. Sacrament, was baptized a two day old baby, Jules.  He was the son of Jacques Launay and his wife Marie Valpinçon, living at No. 8 rue Neuve St. Catherine (now Rue des Francs-Bourgeois, Paris III).  The godmother was Anne Valpinçon, wife of Boissière, residing at no. 30 Rue de la Barillerie (now Bvd. du Palais Paris I & IV).  The godfather was Jules Valpinçon of No. 11 Rue des Deux Boules (Paris I).

I first obtained a copy of the certificate of baptisms of the above Jules in 1933.  I knew something about my grandfather Jules, but I knew nothing of the family except for the little bit of confused information which my father Paul could remember from his conversations with his father Jules.

Paul de Launay (about 1887)

Since Jules died when his son Paul was only 13 & 1/2 years old, the latter’s knowledge was rather vague.  The information which Paul got from his mother Anna was unreliable as she was a social-climber and gave herself and her husband Jules grand (but false) ancestral backgrounds.

Who were these people mentioned in the certificate?  Why was the father named Launay instead of de Launay?  Who were these three Valpinçons?  It was 30 years later in 1963 that knowledge about these people began to unfold.

In January 1962, I arrived in London, England, to spend three years as liaison scientist for the U.S. Office of naval Research, London Branch.  My son Hugh wrote me suggesting that while I was in Europe, perhaps I should investigate our de Launay ancestry.  The idea pleased me, for I had 5 weeks of leave per year and I wished to be doing something active during those times.  But I did not know how to start the research.  Launay, Delaunay, de Launay are very common names in France, so I would need firm clues in order to identify my own de Launays.  Valpinçon, on the other hand, seemed to be a rare name, and form PINSON de VALPINÇON to be contrived (which it proved to be).  Thus, I decided to begin with the Valpinçon Family and leave the de Launay for later.

In the summer of 1962, while in Paris for a week on Navy business [editor’s note: the writer, Jules Richard de Launay, a former Rhodes scholar, and a Navy physicist], I spent an hour each evening looking through the set of telephone books in the Metro station for the name Valpinçon.  Before I began the search, I had reasoned that between Mont Pinson in Calvados and the nearby village Aunay-sur-Odon, there could be a dale called Valpinçon.  Thus, the first place I looked at in the phone books was Aunay-sur-Odon, and there it was:  Pierre de Valpinçon, agrie!  After that happy event, I searched the whole set of volumes, but never found another Valpinçon.

Back in London, I wrote a letter to Monsieur Pierre de Valpinçon, giving him the details from the baptismal certificate of 1813.  I asked if he knew anything about the Valpinçons on the certificate, and if so, would be kindly give me what information he could.  Several months passed by without a reply.  I began to assume that he was not interested and had thrown my letter in the waste paper basket.  In time, however, I was delighted to receive a letter from him.  He said that he had passed my letter on to his cousin l’Abbé Yves Champion of Laval, who was the family genealogist.  The Abbé was injured in an automobile accident just after receiving my letter and was incapacitated for some time, hence the long delay.  The Abbé tol Monsieur de Valpinçon that he was certain that I was their cousin and that he knew the connection.  I was then invited to spend a day in April (1963) in the week after Easter at the farm.

This photo from a later reunion, not 1962.

What happened to the family in Paris after the birth in 1813 of Jules, I had no idea.  In 1982, I engaged the Paris genealogist Madame Margaret Audin of 37 Rue Quintinie, Paris-XV, to find out what happened to them.”

So began Volume 1 of “Jules and Paul de Launay” printed for my uncle Jules Richard de Launay in 1983 by Frank Webster, bookbinder in Canterbury, England.

I will be re-publishing my uncle’s work here, as I transcribe it for republication with my own work, and that of my mother’s, for the descendants of their father, my grandfather Paul de Launay.

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http://wp.me/Ph5jD-34

I just added a new sub-page to the Public Downloads Page.  This is a transcript of a 26 page booklet published in 1888 for the 10th-year anniversary of the first American Protestant Mission to Paris in January 1878, opened by my great-grandparents, Professor Jules de Launay, D.D., and his wife Anna Augusta (born Ollerrenshaw) de Launay. Jules was the second cousin of Martial Caillebotte (the elder).

Jules emigrated to the U.S. in 1841, and then returned to Paris with Annie as American missionaries in December 1877.  Their sons, Paul and Gaston were both born in Paris, as dual citizens.  Paul de Launay would later be awarded France’s two highest awards:  the National Order of the Legion of Honour (Ordre national de la Légion d’honneur) in 1950, and the medal of Officier d’Académie de France in 1936.  Additionally, in 1926, Paul de Launay was made a member of Société Académique d’histoire Internationale.

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en français:

http://wp.me/Ph5jD-34

Je viens d’ajouter un nouveau sous-page à la page Téléchargements publics. Ceci est une transcription d’un livret de 26 pages publié en 1888 pour le 10e anniversaire l’année de la première mission protestante américaine à Paris en Janvier 1878, ouvert par mes grands-parents, le professeur Jules de Launay, DD, et son épouse Anna Augusta (né Ollerrenshaw) de Launay. Jules était le cousin au second degré de Martial Caillebotte (l’aîné).

Jules a émigré aux Etats-Unis en 1841, puis revint à Paris avec Annie comme missionnaires américains en Décembre 1877. Leur fils, Paul et Gaston sont tous deux nés à Paris, que la double citoyenneté. Paul de Launay sera plus tard attribué France les deux plus hautes distinctions: l’Ordre national de la Légion d’Honneur en 1950, et la médaille d’Officier d’Académie de France en 1936. En outre, en 1926, Paul de Launay a été fait membre de la Société Académique d’histoire internationale.

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This morning my mother and I were cataloging old family photos from the 1800’s and early 1900’s when we finally found the photo of President & Mrs. James A. Garfield we thought was lost.  The photo was given to my great-grandmother, Annie (Ollerenshaw) de Launay in the 1880’s by Mrs. Garfield.  We have a letter dated 20 November 1883, and publish in “The Christian” on 29 December 1883 on page 486 (Microfilm reel 18, Volume 18), that one photo was given to her, along with a photo (on porcelain) of the Late President, during her personal visit to the former First Lady in Ohio in 1883.  The back of this photo, however, seems to show either 1884 or 1887.  The last digit is difficult to read, but appears to be in the First Lady’s handwriting.  The bottom of the backside has other writing that appears to have either worn off, or been scratched off for whatever reason, but is in different handwriting.

The President and Former First Lady gave financial support to my great-grandfather’s Protestant mission to Paris, which began in January 1878.  The “Christian Standard” (a weekly) was first published in Cleveland, Ohio.  James A. Garfield, the future President of the United States, headed the board of Editors of the “Christian Publishing Association”, founded in 1866.

 

En français:

Ce matin, ma mère et moi étions catalogage vieilles photos de famille des années 1800 et début des années 1900 lorsque nous avons finalement trouvé la photo du président et Mme James Garfield A. l’on croyait perdu. La photo a été donné à mon arrière grand-mère, Annie (Ollerenshaw) de Launay dans les années 1880 par Mme Garfield. Nous avons une lettre datée du 20 Novembre 1883, et publie dans “Le chrétien”, le 29 Décembre 1883 sur la page 486 (Bobine de microfilm 18, tome 18), que d’une photo lui a été donné, avec une photo (sur porcelaine) de la Feu le Président, lors de sa visite personnelle de l’ex-Première Dame dans l’Ohio en 1883. Le dos de cette photo, toutefois, semble montrer, soit 1884 ou 1887. Le dernier chiffre est difficile à lire, mais semble être de la main de la Première Dame. Le fond de l’arrière a écrit d’autres qui semble avoir soit disparu, soit été gratté pour une raison quelconque, mais est en écriture différente.

Le président et ex-First Lady a apporté son soutien financier à la mission protestante de mon grand-père à Paris, qui a débuté en Janvier 1878. Le “Christian Standard” (une semaine) a été publiée à Cleveland, Ohio. James A. Garfield, le futur président des États-Unis, a dirigé le comité de rédaction de l ‘«Association chrétienne de publication”, fondée en 1866.

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